Master of Science in Nursing Ranked 24th Nationally by U.S. News and World Report, Jan 01, 2014 | By Ferris State University

Ferris State University ranked 24th, nationally, on the U.S. News and World Report list of “Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs.” The rankings were released this week. Ferris’ Master of Science in Nursing was rated 24th – tied with Drexel University, based in Philadelphia; Johns Hopkins University, of Baltimore, Md.; Old Dominion University, of Norfolk, Va.; the University of Central Florida, in Orlando; the University of Kansas, in Lawrence; and the University of Michigan-Flint. Ferris and UM-Flint were the top-ranked online nursing schools in the state of Michigan. Primary factors considered in the newly-released 2014 U.S. News and World Report rankings include: faculty credentials, graduation rates, as well as student services and technologies. “The continued ranking of our MSN online program confirms the great work that has been done by our faculty, staff and academic advisors,” said Matthew Adeyanju, dean of the College of Health Professions. “We congratulate the School of Nursing and all those involved in our MSN program.”

Nursing5Historically, Ferris’ nursing programs have provided career mobility options for students in pursuit of a start in the field of nursing in addition to helping nurses who are seeking advanced degrees at the undergraduate level, with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and at the graduate level, with the MSN. Ferris is at the top among Michigan-based MSN programs and in the top 25 percent, nationally, as ranked by U.S. News and World Report. “The School of Nursing and the university have placed a clear focus on the categories reflecting the U.S. News and World Report ranking: student engagement, faculty credentials and training, admissions selectivity, and student services and technology. These are all areas where the demand for online education continues to grow rapidly,” said Susan Owens, MSN program coordinator and an assistant professor of Nursing at Ferris. “Peer assessment is a new category in the rankings this year, so this rating affirms that the innovative-and evidence-based practices used in our courses were recognized. We’re pleased to offer a program that demonstrates an outstanding example of effective online program delivery.” The School of Nursing enrolls approximately 100 students in its MSN program, which features a learner-centered curriculum designed to equip nurses with the knowledge and skills that are vital for a variety of advanced specialty practice roles. The MSN features three concentrations in specialty leadership roles: nursing administration, nursing informatics and nursing education. As a fully online program, the university attracts students and instructors from across the country to create a diverse student population as well as instructional experts in nursing leadership roles. Ferris’ graduate nursing program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing. “Through our MSN program, we strive to provide career mobility through flexible programming for the working nurse,” Owens said. “The School of Nursing is especially fortunate to have outstanding support from Ferris’ Technology Assistance Center, where IT experts demonstrate the utmost support for online students and faculty providing amazing and immediate technical assistance.”

Master of Science in Nursing Ranked 24th Nationally by U.S. News and World Report, Jan 01, 2014 | By Ferris State University

Ferris State University ranked 24th, nationally, on the U.S. News and World Report list of “Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs.” The rankings were released this week. Ferris’ Master of Science in Nursing was rated 24th – tied with Drexel University, based in Philadelphia; Johns Hopkins University, of Baltimore, Md.; Old Dominion University, of Norfolk, Va.; the University of Central Florida, in Orlando; the University of Kansas, in Lawrence; and the University of Michigan-Flint. Ferris and UM-Flint were the top-ranked online nursing schools in the state of Michigan. Primary factors considered in the newly-released 2014 U.S. News and World Report rankings include: faculty credentials, graduation rates, as well as student services and technologies. “The continued ranking of our MSN online program confirms the great work that has been done by our faculty, staff and academic advisors,” said Matthew Adeyanju, dean of the College of Health Professions. “We congratulate the School of Nursing and all those involved in our MSN program.”

Historically, Ferris’ nursing programs have provided career mobility options for students in pursuit of a start in the field of nursing in addition to helping nurses who are seeking advanced degrees at the undergraduate level, with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and at the graduate level, with the MSN. Ferris is at the top among Michigan-based MSN programs and in the top 25 percent, nationally, as ranked by U.S. News and World Report. “The School of Nursing and the university have placed a clear focus on the categories reflecting the U.S. News and World Report ranking: student engagement, faculty credentials and training, admissions selectivity, and student services and technology. These are all areas where the demand for online education continues to grow rapidly,” said Susan Owens, MSN program coordinator and an assistant professor of Nursing at Ferris. “Peer assessment is a new category in the rankings this year, so this rating affirms that the innovative-and evidence-based practices used in our courses were recognized. We’re pleased to offer a program that demonstrates an outstanding example of effective online program delivery.”

The School of Nursing enrolls approximately 100 students in its MSN program, which features a learner-centered curriculum designed to equip nurses with the knowledge and skills that are vital for a variety of advanced specialty practice roles. The MSN features three concentrations in specialty leadership roles: nursing administration, nursing informatics and nursing education. As a fully online program, the university attracts students and instructors from across the country to create a diverse student population as well as instructional experts in nursing leadership roles. Ferris’ graduate nursing program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing. “Through our MSN program, we strive to provide career mobility through flexible programming for the working nurse,” Owens said. “The School of Nursing is especially fortunate to have outstanding support from Ferris’ Technology Assistance Center, where IT experts demonstrate the utmost support for online students and faculty providing amazing and immediate technical assistance.”

Growth in 2012 health care spending remained at record low, Jan. 07, 2014 | By Tony Pugh

newsWASHINGTON Total public and private spending for health care in the United States increased to nearly $2.8 trillion in 2012, or nearly $9,000 per person, according to a government report released Monday. That 3.7 percent increase from 2011 marked the fourth straight year that national health care spending has grown at the lowest rates ever recorded in the 53 years that the data has been tracked. “The low rates of national health spending growth and relative stability since 2009 primarily reflect the lagged impacts of the recent severe economic recession,” when many Americans lost job-based health coverage and postponed or reduced their doctor visits and medical care as a result, said Anne B. Martin, an economist in the Office of the Actuary at the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Because total health spending grew more slowly than gross domestic product, the share of the economy devoted to health care fell slightly in 2012 to 17.2 percent, from 17.3 percent in 2011. It was the first such decline in health care spending as a share of the nation’s overall economic output since 1997.

Spending for health services typically stabilize two to three years after a recession, as pre-negotiated prices for medical services work their way through the health system and more people become eligible for public programs like Medicaid, said Aaron Catlin, deputy director of CMS’ National Health Statistics Group.

The aftermath of a recession also causes employers to adjust the type and generosity of coverage they provide, while consumers curb their consumption of medical care.

“Those types of decisions are not often immediately impacted during a recession,” Catlin said. “You see those changes in behavior occur several years after the recession.” From 2010 to 2012, Martin said, the Affordable Care Act has had a “minimal effect” on aggregate national health care expenditures, accounting for an increase of less than one-tenth of 1 percent over the three-year period. Provisions of the health law that have positively and negatively affected health care spending include Medicaid rebates for prescription drugs, expanded Medicare drug coverage and dependent coverage for children under age 26. Another contributing factor has been the law’s requirement that insurers spend at least 80 percent of premium revenue on medical claims or quality improvements. The real impact of the health care law on national health expenditures won’t be reflected in a meaningful way until 2014 data is detailed. That will include the impact of an estimated 9 million-plus new Medicaid recipients and millions of Americans who must purchase health coverage in 2014 or face a fine under the law’s individual mandate.

Many wonder if the improving growth rates reflect a larger, more fundamental change in the health sector that will endure. The report’s authors were unable to answer that question in an article that summarized their findings in the January issue of the journal Health Affairs.

“From our perspective, more historical evidence is needed before concluding that we have observed a structural break in the historical relationship between the health sector and the overall economy,” the report stated.

The overall growth in 2012 health expenditures was driven by spending increases for hospital care – the largest component of national health spending – patient out-of-pocket expenses, physician and clinical services and spending for Medicaid, the federal-state insurance program for the poor and disabled. Offsetting those increases were notable declines in 2012 spending growth for retail prescription drugs, nursing care services, private health insurance and expenditures for Medicare, the federal health insurance program for older Americans.

Spending for hospital services, which grew by 4.9 percent and totaled $882 billion in 2012, was mainly because of higher prices and greater use of higher-level care. Spending for physician and clinical services grew 4.6 percent in 2012 to $565 billion because of increased usage and greater complexity of services being sought.

Spending for Medicaid increased 3.3 percent in 2012 to $421.2 billion. That’s up from a 2.4 percent increase in 2011. Both increases represented the smallest growth rates in the program’s history, except for 2006 when the Medicare prescription drug benefit was implemented. The new drug benefit changed the way Medicaid paid for some beneficiaries’ prescription drugs.

Out-of-pocket spending for co-pays and deductibles reached $328 billion in 2012, up 3.8 percent from 2011 because of increased cost sharing for physician and clinical services.

Spending for prescription drugs reached $263.3 billion in 2012, up just 0.4 percent from 2011. The slow growth was because of a large number of blockbuster drugs, like Lipitor, Plavix and Singulair, losing their patent protection, which led to greater sales of cheaper generic equivalents.

Premiums for private health insurance grew by 3.2 percent, to $917 billion, in 2012. That’s down from a 3.4 percent increase in 2011. The slower growth rate was mainly because of lower overall enrollment growth and increased enrollment in cheaper high-deductible plans.

Medicare spending grew slightly in 2012, reaching $572 billion, even though the program’s enrollment jumped 4.1 percent for the largest one-year bump in 39 years as the first wave of aging baby boomers began joining the program. Despite the enrollment increase, Medicare spending grew at a slower rate in 2012 than in 2011 because of a one-time payment reduction for skilled nursing facilities.

Growth in 2012 health care spending remained at record low, Jan. 07, 2014 | By Tony Pugh

WASHINGTON Total public and private spending for health care in the United States increased to nearly $2.8 trillion in 2012, or nearly $9,000 per person, according to a government report released Monday. That 3.7 percent increase from 2011 marked the fourth straight year that national health care spending has grown at the lowest rates ever recorded in the 53 years that the data has been tracked. “The low rates of national health spending growth and relative stability since 2009 primarily reflect the lagged impacts of the recent severe economic recession,” when many Americans lost job-based health coverage and postponed or reduced their doctor visits and medical care as a result, said Anne B. Martin, an economist in the Office of the Actuary at the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Because total health spending grew more slowly than gross domestic product, the share of the economy devoted to health care fell slightly in 2012 to 17.2 percent, from 17.3 percent in 2011. It was the first such decline in health care spending as a share of the nation’s overall economic output since 1997.

newsSpending for health services typically stabilize two to three years after a recession, as pre-negotiated prices for medical services work their way through the health system and more people become eligible for public programs like Medicaid, said Aaron Catlin, deputy director of CMS’ National Health Statistics Group. The aftermath of a recession also causes employers to adjust the type and generosity of coverage they provide, while consumers curb their consumption of medical care. “Those types of decisions are not often immediately impacted during a recession,” Catlin said. “You see those changes in behavior occur several years after the recession.” From 2010 to 2012, Martin said, the Affordable Care Act has had a “minimal effect” on aggregate national health care expenditures, accounting for an increase of less than one-tenth of 1 percent over the three-year period. Provisions of the health law that have positively and negatively affected health care spending include Medicaid rebates for prescription drugs, expanded Medicare drug coverage and dependent coverage for children under age 26. Another contributing factor has been the law’s requirement that insurers spend at least 80 percent of premium revenue on medical claims or quality improvements. The real impact of the health care law on national health expenditures won’t be reflected in a meaningful way until 2014 data is detailed. That will include the impact of an estimated 9 million-plus new Medicaid recipients and millions of Americans who must purchase health coverage in 2014 or face a fine under the law’s individual mandate.

Many wonder if the improving growth rates reflect a larger, more fundamental change in the health sector that will endure. The report’s authors were unable to answer that question in an article that summarized their findings in the January issue of the journal Health Affairs.

“From our perspective, more historical evidence is needed before concluding that we have observed a structural break in the historical relationship between the health sector and the overall economy,” the report stated.

The overall growth in 2012 health expenditures was driven by spending increases for hospital care – the largest component of national health spending – patient out-of-pocket expenses, physician and clinical services and spending for Medicaid, the federal-state insurance program for the poor and disabled.

Offsetting those increases were notable declines in 2012 spending growth for retail prescription drugs, nursing care services, private health insurance and expenditures for Medicare, the federal health insurance program for older Americans.

Spending for hospital services, which grew by 4.9 percent and totaled $882 billion in 2012, was mainly because of higher prices and greater use of higher-level care. Spending for physician and clinical services grew 4.6 percent in 2012 to $565 billion because of increased usage and greater complexity of services being sought.

Spending for Medicaid increased 3.3 percent in 2012 to $421.2 billion. That’s up from a 2.4 percent increase in 2011. Both increases represented the smallest growth rates in the program’s history, except for 2006 when the Medicare prescription drug benefit was implemented. The new drug benefit changed the way Medicaid paid for some beneficiaries’ prescription drugs.

Out-of-pocket spending for co-pays and deductibles reached $328 billion in 2012, up 3.8 percent from 2011 because of increased cost sharing for physician and clinical services.

Spending for prescription drugs reached $263.3 billion in 2012, up just 0.4 percent from 2011. The slow growth was because of a large number of blockbuster drugs, like Lipitor, Plavix and Singulair, losing their patent protection, which led to greater sales of cheaper generic equivalents.

Premiums for private health insurance grew by 3.2 percent, to $917 billion, in 2012. That’s down from a 3.4 percent increase in 2011. The slower growth rate was mainly because of lower overall enrollment growth and increased enrollment in cheaper high-deductible plans.

Medicare spending grew slightly in 2012, reaching $572 billion, even though the program’s enrollment jumped 4.1 percent for the largest one-year bump in 39 years as the first wave of aging baby boomers began joining the program. Despite the enrollment increase, Medicare spending grew at a slower rate in 2012 than in 2011 because of a one-time payment reduction for skilled nursing facilities.

New study reveals fastest growing occupations through 2017, Nov 07, 2013 | By Susan Ricker

Eleven million Americans are currently looking for work, yet 45 percent of human resources managers say they are unable to find qualified candidates for their open positions. For job seekers, this might not make sense; for HR managers, it all comes down to who has the right qualifications right now. This skills gap is a growing problem for employers and workers alike, but it can be overcome. In “The Talent Equation,” a new book by Matt Ferguson (CEO of CareerBuilder), Lorin Hitt (Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania) and Prasanna Tambe (Stern School, New York University), issues such as the labor market’s skills gap challenge are explored, as well as how big data has the potential to transform human resources.

What job seekers can do?

HR managers, eager to fill vacant positions and keep their businesses productive and profitable, have to decide between taking longer to find an ideal candidate and investing their resources into reskilling or educating an applicant who has some, but not all, of the necessary skills. According to research from the book, 8 in 10 employers express concern over an emerging skills gap, but only 4 in 10 say their company is doing anything to alleviate it.

Where does this leave job seekers?

While employers decide how they’re going to overcome the skills gap from a hiring standpoint, job seekers can take steps to find the right roles. For example, jobs that are projected to grow the most in the coming years are high-wage occupations, and jobs require associate, bachelor’s and master’s degrees will all outpace jobs requiring short-term, on-the-job training. Job seekers might want to consider additional education or certifications to align themselves with these growing positions, which are in demand today and will be in the future.

The fastest-growing occupations

As employers find better ways to recruit, provide workers with more training opportunities and narrow the skills gap, more job seekers will be able to find roles in which they can be successful.  Knowing which occupations have a bright outlook can further help job seekers focus their career.

A new report from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. on the projected fastest-growing occupations in the U.S. from 2013 to 2017 can give job seekers the direction they need. “Projections provide an important look at the future of the labor market, and can be used to spot emerging trends that have implications for students and job seekers, as well as businesses and economic planners,” Ferguson says. “Barring any major shocks to the economy, the short-term job outlook in the United States will likely continue developments seen during the recovery specifically, significant growth for jobs that require a college education and occupations in health care, energy and technology.”

The following list, adapted from the report, spotlights the fastest-growing occupations that are projected to see at least 8 percent growth and 30,000 jobs added from 2013 through 2017.

1. Personal care and home health aides
Projected growth: 21 percent
New jobs: 473,965
Median hourly earnings: $9.77

 

2. Market research analysts and marketing specialists
Projected growth: 14 percent
New jobs: 60,889
Median hourly earnings: $29.10

 

3. Medical secretaries 
Projected growth: 14 percent
New jobs: 76,386
Median hourly earnings: $15.17

 

4. Emergency medical technicians and paramedics
Projected growth: 
13 percent
New jobs: 30,234
Median hourly earnings: $15.28

 

5. Software developers (systems and applications)
Projected growth: 
11 percent
New jobs: 110,049
Median hourly earnings: $47.64

 

6. Medical assistants
Projected growth: 
10 percent
New jobs: 60,109
Median hourly earnings: $14.35

 

7. Registered nurses
Growth: 
9 percent
New jobs: 256,703
Median hourly earnings: $32.04

 

8. Network and computer systems administrators
Growth: 
9 percent
New jobs: 34,825
Median hourly earnings: $35.14

 

9. Pharmacy technicians
Growth: 
9 percent
New jobs: 31,975
Median hourly earnings: $14.29

 

10. Landscaping and groundskeeping workers
Growth: 
9 percent
New jobs: 111,444
Median hourly earnings: $11.07

 

11. Social and human service assistants
Growth: 
9 percent
New jobs: 34,411
Median hourly earnings: $14.02

 

12. Computer systems analysts
Growth: 
8 percent
New jobs: 40,462
Median hourly earnings: $37.98

 

13. Management analysts  
Growth: 8 percent
New jobs: 60,157
Median hourly earnings: $35.80

 

14. Cooks, restaurant
Growth: 
8 percent
New jobs: 79,364
Median hourly earnings: $10.63

 

15. Insurance sales agents
Growth: 
8 percent
New jobs: 52,565
Median hourly earnings: $23.20

 

16. Nursing assistants
Growth: 
8 percent
New jobs: 117,400
Median hourly earnings: $12.01

 

17. Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses
Growth:
 8 percent
New jobs: 63,320
Median hourly earnings: $20.33

 

18. Combined food prep and serving, incl. fast food
Growth: 
8 percent
New jobs: 237,192
Median hourly earnings: $8.75

 

19. Receptionists and information clerks
Growth: 
8 percent
New jobs: 85,035
Median hourly earnings: $12.64

‘Dead’ man’s recovery shows why prolonged CPR works, Aug. 22, 2013 | By Barbara Mantel – NBC News

An Ohio man’s recovery several minutes after doctors declared him dead shows how murky the decision can be about when to stop resuscitation efforts. While Anthony Yahle, 37, may not have been dead for 45 minutes, as was widely reported, his remarkable bounce back without suffering brain damage or other ill effects stunned doctors at Kettering Medical Center in Kettering, Ohio. Yahle, a diesel mechanic from West Carrollton, Ohio, “coded” — a term meaning emergency — on the afternoon of Aug. 5, after arriving in the hospital that morning in cardiac arrest. A team of doctors rushed to his hospital bedside and used chest compressions, a bag connected to a breathing tube and medications to force blood and oxygen through his body. After 45 minutes, they gave up and declared him dead.

“He was truly flatlined at the end of that code. He had no electrical motion, no respiration, and no heart beat, and no blood pressure,” says Jayne Testa, director of cardiovascular services at Kettering.

But five to seven minutes later, the team noticed a trace of electrical activity on his heart monitor and resumed their efforts to resuscitate him. Yahle is now home recovering, according to Testa.

While Yahle “was not dead for 45 minutes,” the Kettering doctors “have never seen somebody come back after the code was ended and especially after so many minutes,” says Testa.

Michael Sayre, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle and a spokesperson for the American Heart Association, says he has seen and heard of similar cases. It’s unusual but not unique, he says. Sayre doesn’t know what happened in Yahle’s case, but sometimes during resuscitation air gets trapped and pressure builds in the lungs, preventing blood from flowing into the heart.

“So, I have seen once or twice where we would disconnect the bag from the breathing tube and push on the chest to let the air out, and then the patient would get a pulse and have a blood pressure because they were able to get blood back to the heart,” says Sayre.

In any case, Sayre says more hospitals may want to follow Kettering’s lead and sustain resuscitation efforts for longer than the typical 20 to 25 minutes. A 2012 nationwide study of hospitals showed that “in the hospitals where they worked for longer, they got more people back, who ended up surviving and going home,” says Sayre.

Technology can help a team decide when to stop. Most hospitals now have the ability to measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the air coming out of the patient. Carbon dioxide is a byproduct of living cells. No carbon dioxide would add to the evidence that the patient is dead. Kettering Medical Center does not continuously measure carbon dioxide levels during resuscitation.

“However, you can be faked out,” says Sayre. And sometimes even with fairly normal carbon dioxide levels, a team will stop resuscitation because “we still cannot get the heart to beat on its own,” says Sayre.

But in Yahle’s case, doctors were finally able to get his heart to beat spontaneously.

“This team did a really good job. They were able to keep his brain alive, and that’s why he survived,” says Sayre.

The Kettering doctors cooled Yahle’s body, and that may have preserved his brain function. “People can definitely go seven minutes without blood flow if the brain is cooled. That is something that is well known,” says Sayre. For example, during brain surgery, doctors cool the body and stop blood flow for even longer periods of time.

There are theories about why that works. “But no one really knows the answer to that,” says Sayre.

CPR less likely for minorities on street or home, Dec 24, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner

CHICAGO — People who collapse from cardiac arrest in poor black neighborhoods are half as likely to get CPR from family members at home or bystanders on the street as those in better-off white neighborhoods, according to a study that found the reasons go beyond race.

The findings suggest a big need for more knowledge and training, the researchers said.

The study looked at data on more than 14,000 people in 29 U.S. cities. It’s one of the largest to show how race, income and other neighborhood characteristics combine to affect someone’s willingness to offer heart-reviving help.

More than 300,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest in their homes or other non-hospital settings every year, and most don’t survive. A cardiac arrest is when the heart stops, and it’s often caused by a heart attack, but not always. Quick, hard chest compressions can help people survive.

For their study, researchers looked at the makeup of neighborhoods and also the race of the victims. They found that blacks and Hispanics were 30 percent less likely to be aided than white people. The odds were the worst if the heart victim was black in a low-income black neighborhood.

The researchers also found that regardless of a neighborhood’s racial makeup, CPR was less likely to be offered in poor areas. That shows that socio-economic status makes more difference than the neighborhood’s racial makeup, said lead author Dr. Comilla Sasson, of the University of Colorado in Denver.

While few people in poor black neighborhoods got CPR, those who did faced double the odds of surviving. Overall, only 8 percent of patients survived until at least hospital discharge, but 12 percent of those who got bystander CPR did versus just 6 percent of those who did not.

About 80 percent of the cardiac arrest victims in the study had collapsed in their own homes. That suggests lack of knowledge about how to do CPR. But also, people tend to panic and freeze when they encounter someone in cardiac arrest, and they need to know that cardiopulmonary resuscitation is easier than many realize, Sasson said.

She said the study results should prompt public outcry — especially since most people who suffer cardiac arrest in non-hospital settings won’t survive and those statistics haven’t changed in 30 years.

“We can’t accept that anymore,” she said. “It shouldn’t matter where I drop to have someone help me,” Sasson said.

The study appears in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine.

The researchers analyzed data from 2005-2009 from a cardiac arrest registry coordinated by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Emory University. They also examined U.S. Census data in cities where study patients were stricken — including Atlanta; Boston; Columbus, Ohio; Denver; Houston; Nashville; and San Francisco. Whether similar results would be found in small cities or rural areas isn’t known.

Much of the research was done before experts changed CPR advice in a move many think may encourage bystanders to offer help. American Heart Association guidelines issued in 2008 emphasize quick, hard chest compressions rather than mouth-to-mouth resuscitation — removing some of the discomfort factor.

Mary Tappe owes her life to bystanders’ willingness to offer help.

In 2004, she collapsed at her office in Iowa. A co-worker called 911; another quickly began CPR and someone else used the office’s automated heart defibrillator. An ambulance took Tappe to the hospital, where doctors said her heart had stopped. They never determined why but implanted an internal defibrillator.

Tappe, 51, who now lives in Englewood, Colo., said raising awareness about the importance of CPR is “incredibly important because that’s the first step” to helping people survive.

CPR specialist Dr. Dana Edelson, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago Medical Center, said the new research echoes smaller studies showing bystander CPR depends on neighborhood characteristics, including a Chicago study that found intervention occurred most often in integrated neighborhoods.

“Nothing that we do has as big an impact on survival as CPR, and it’s so cheap,” Edelson said, noting that online videos demonstrate how to do CPR.

It involves pushing hard and fast on the victim’s chest; research has shown using the beat of the old Bee Gees song “Stayin’ Alive” is a good guide.

“It’s your ultimate low-budget solution to improving survival,” Edelson said.

Dr. David Keseg, an emergency medicine specialist at Ohio State University, has helped teach CPR to eighth-graders in inner-city Columbus, Ohio. That includes giving them free classes and CPR kits.

“We tell them to take them home and show their families and neighborhoods how to do it,” Keseg said.

“It’s kind of a drop in the bucket,” but it’s the kind of targeted approach that is needed to improve the odds of surviving a cardiac arrest, he said.

Four Good Reasons to Be a Certified Nursing Assistant, Nov 30, 2007 | By Kaitlin Coffey

Congratulations! You have decided that you would like to seek more information about the rewarding job of a certified nursing assistant. It is important to learn more about what a C.N.A. does and some of the challenges that you might face as a C.N.A.

Why do you want to be a C.N.A.? It is important to choose this job for the right reasons. In society this job doesn’t receive the respect that it deserves. Here are some good reasons for wanting to become a C.N.A.:

1 – I always wanted to be in the medical field. – As a C.N.A you will be focused on personal care opposed to medical care but it gives you more time to interact with the patient and also to observe other jobs that you may interest you in the medical field.

2 – I want to accomplish something important in my life. – As a C.N.A. you are making a difference in not only the lives of the patients that you help, but also their friends and families. You are helping make many peoples lives more comfortable, and it can be a very rewarding experience. You also make a difference for the nursing staff. Nurses are very high in demand right now and your job tasks allow for the nurses to be able to see more patients and provide more care.

3 – I want to earn a stable income. – As a C.N.A. you will be able to maintain a stable income and expect to make anywhere from $9.00 – $14.00 an hour to start. (depending on your location).

4 – I hope to be a nurse someday. – As a C.N.A. you will get to work directly with the nursing staff and observe what they do. This is an excellent opportunity to ask questions and learn more about nursing from someone with experience. What are some of the challenges I might face?

(1) Being around older or disabled people. – Some people are uncomfortable being around older or disabled people. Most jobs as a C.N.A. will have you working around the elderly or the disabled. Once you overcome your fears you will be more understanding and a better C.N.A.

(2) Sights you may see in a nursing home. – You may observe a lot of things that are very difficult to watch. You are working with a lot of different patients with many different conditions. One day you might observe a wife coming to visit her husband and he doesn’t remember who she is. You might have patients asking you to take them home. Or have someone tell you that a loved one is coming to visit and that person passed on many years ago. You may also experience the patients hurting themselves or loved ones, and sometimes trying to harm you. You have to look at these situations and ask yourself “How can I make this better?”

(3) Fears of death or sickness – As you get to know your patients you begin to fear that they may become sick or die. Or you might even worry that you or a loved one may get sick or die. If you do experience death at work you should try to remember that you helped make their life better.

(4) Fear of aging. – As you work around the elderly you may develop fears of aging. The best way to deal with this is to talk to someone and to remember that everyone ages and that as along as you take care of yourself then you will be fine.

If you are still interested in becoming a C.N.A. you should find out what your state and local requirements are to obtain certification.